Is poison ivy really poisonous?

A popular summer-camp rhyme is “Leaves of three, let it be.” Poison ivy, the threeleaved plant that grows wild in all regions of the United States, is aggravating to the skin, though not lethal if swallowed unless you are very allergic. After brushing up against the poison ivy plant, a red rash usually develops.

Rubbing the rash will not spread poison ivy to other parts of the body (or to another person) unless urushiol oil—the sticky, resin-like substance that causes the rash—has been left on your hands. Other plants that usually irritate the skin upon contact include cowhage, poison oak, poison sumac, rengas tree, and trumpet vine.

Why are hot summer days called “the dog days”?

Sirius, the “dog star,” is within the constellation Canis Major and is the brightest in the heavens. The ancient Egyptians noted that the dog star’s arrival in July coincided with the annual flooding of the Nile, which was important for a good harvest.

The Romans believed that, because of its brightness, the dog star Sirius added to the heat of the summer sun, and so they called July and August “the dog days.”

Why does the body need vitamins and minerals?

Vitamins are chemicals that the body needs to function well; minerals are metals and salts that the body also needs in tiny amounts to run properly. Both help the human body grow. Different foods, like vegetables, contain different amounts of vitamins and minerals, so it is important to have variety in your diet so you can get a good balance. When it comes to vitamins, each one works differently in your body. Vitamin D in milk helps your bones grow; vitamin A in carrots helps you see at night; vitamin C in oranges helps boost your immune system and helps your body heal if you get a wound; and the B vitamins in leafy green vegetables help your body make protein and energy.

And although some vitamins like A (which helps your eyesight) and D are stored in your body (for several days or up to several months), others, like C and the B vitamins, quickly pass through your bloodstream. So it’s important to replace your vitamins every day.

Interesting facts about Hair

1.    On average, a man spends about five months of his life shaving.
2.    On average, a hair strand’s life span is five and a half years.
3.    On average redheads have 90,000 hairs. People with black hair have about 110,000 hairs.
4.    Next to bone marrow, hair is the fastest growing tissue in the human body.
5.    In a lifetime, an average man will shave 20,000 times.
6.    Humans have about the same number of hair follicles as a chimpanzee has.
7.    Hair will fall out faster on a person that is on a crash diet.
8.    The longest human beard on record is 17.5 feet, held by Hans N. Langseth who was born in Norway in 1846.
9.    The average human head weighs about eight pounds.
10.    The reason why some people get a cowlick is because the growth of their hair is in a spiral pattern, which causes the hair to either stand straight up, or goes to a certain angle.
11.    The reason why hair turns gray as we age is because the pigment cells in the hair follicle start to die, which is responsible for producing “melanin” which gives the hair colour.
12.    The fastest growing tissue in the human body is hair.

13.    A lifespan of an eyelash is approximately 150 days.
14.    A survey done by Clairol 10 years ago came up with 46% of men stating that it was okay to color their hair. Now 66% of men admit to coloring their hair.
15.    The big toe is the foot reflexology pressure point for the head.
16.    The average human scalp has 100,000 hairs.
17.    The first hair dryer was a vacuum cleaner that was used for drying hair.
18.    Ancient Egyptians used to think having facial hair was an indication of personal neglect.
19.    The loss of eyelashes is referred to as madarosis.
20.    Hair and fingernails are made from the same substance, keratin.
21.    Eyebrow hair lasts between 3-5 months before it sheds.
22.    A Russian man who wore a beard during the time of Peter the Great had to pay a special tax.
23.    Everyday approximately 35 meters of hair fiber is produced on the scalp of an adult.
24.    Hair is made from the same substance as fingernails.
25.    Brylcreem, which was created in 1929, was the first man’s hair product.

What is aloe vera?

A cactus-like plant of the lily family, aloe vera grows wild in Madagascar and on the African continent. It also is cultivated in Japan, the Caribbean, the Mediterranean, and the United States. People around the world have used its gooey, jelly-like sap for healing and cosmetic purposes.

Aloe extracts can be used to treat digestive problems, including constipation, and aloe oils are used in cosmetic creams to help keep skin soft and to treat minor skin irritations.

Will a wart go away if I wrap it in duct tape?

Maybe. Warts are skin infections caused by a common virus called HPV (human papillomavirus). They are perfectly “normal,” in that health researchers estimate that three out of four people will develop a wart some time in their lives, usually on their hands or feet. It can take months or years for a wart to disappear on its own. To speed up the process, some skin doctors recommend wrapping the wart in duct tape until it disappears.

The duct tape removes dead skin from the wart, thereby gradually killing off the wart virus that lives in the skin. It may also trigger the body’s immune system to attack the wart virus. Otherwise the wart can be removed by a doctor with a laser or liquid nitrogen, a substance that freezes the skin, killing the cells.

Why do people become disabled?

A disability can be the result of a disease, an accident, or of genetics, which means that it is a condition that a person is born with.

A lot of times disabled people can learn new ways to do things or use special machines or specially trained animals to help them work around their disability.

Interesting facts about Eye

1.    We should never put anything in or near our eyes, unless we have a reason to use eye drops. We would only do that if our doctor or parent told us to use them.
2.    If the lens in our eye doesn’t work quite right, we can get glasses to help us see. Glasses have lenses in them that work with our eye’s own lens to help us see better.
3.    Just behind the pupil is a lens. It is round and flat. It is thicker toward the middle.
4.    Over the front of our eye is a clear covering called the “conjunctiva.”
5.    Blinking helps to wash tears over our eyeballs. That keeps them clean and moist. Also, if something is about to hit our eye, we will blink automatically.
6.    Some people start to sneeze if they are exposed to sunlight or have a light shined into their eye.
7.    The highest recorded speed of a sneeze is 165 km per hour.
8.    Our eyes have many parts. The black part on the front of our eye is called the “pupil.” It is really a little hole that opens into the back part of our eyes.
9.    Our body has some natural protection for our eyes. Our eyelashes help to keep dirt out of our eyes. Our eyebrows are made to keep sweat from running into our eyes.
10.    The most common injury caused by cosmetics is to the eye by a mascara wand.
11.    It is impossible to sneeze with your eyes open.
12.    Around the pupil is a colored muscle called the “iris.” Our eyes may be BLUE, BROWN, GREEN, GRAY OR BLACK, because that is the color of the iris.
13.    Our eyes are very important to us, and we must protect them. We don’t want dirt, sand, splinters or even fingers to get in our eyes.
14.    The reason why your nose gets runny when you are crying is because the tears from the eyes drain into the nose.
15.    The space between your eyebrows is called the Glabella.

16.    The white part of our eye is called the “sclera.” At the front, the sclera becomes clear and is called the “cornea.”
17.    We don’t want our eyes to get scratched or poked. That could damage our sight!
18.    Babies’ eyes do not produce tears until the baby is approximately six to eight weeks old.
19.    Inside our eye, at the back, is a part called the “retina.” On the retina are cells called “rods” and “cones.” These rods and cones help us to see colors and light.
20.    Your eyes blinks over 10,000,000 times a year!
21.    The study of the iris of the eye is called iridology.
22.    The shark cornea has been used in eye surgery, since its cornea is similar to a human cornea.
23.    The number one cause of blindness in adults in the United States is diabetes.
24.    The eyeball of a human weighs approximately 28 grams.
25.    The eye of a human can distinguish 500 shades of the gray.
26.    The cornea is the only living tissue in the human body that does not contain any blood vessels.
27.    The conjunctiva is a membrane that covers the human eye.
28.    Sailors once thought that wearing a gold earring would improve their eyesight.
29.    Research has indicated that a tie that is on too tight cam increase the risk of glaucoma in men.
30.    People generally read 25% slower from a computer screen compared to paper.
31.    Men are able to read fine print better than women can.
32.    In the United States, approximately 25,000 eye injuries occur that result in the person becoming totally blind.
33.    All babies are colour blind when they are born.
34.    A human eyeball weighs an ounce.

What is smog?

The word “smog” was first used in London during the early 1900s to describe the combination of smoke and fog. Today, the term “smog” is used to describe a mixture of pollutants, primarily made up of ground-level ozone. Ozone can be beneficial or harmful depending on its location. The ozone located high above the surface in the stratosphere protects human health and the environment, but ground-level ozone is responsible for the choking, coughing, and stinging eyes associated with smog.

Smog-forming pollutants come from many sources, such as automobile exhaust, power plants, factories, and many consumer products, including paints, hair spray, charcoal starter fluid, solvents, and even plastic popcorn packaging. In many American cities, at least half of the pollutants come from cars, buses, trucks, and boats. Scientists estimate that about 90 million Americans live in areas with ozone levels above the standards for health safety.

What are allergies?

An allergic reaction is a reaction to a substance that is normally harmless to most other people. Allergies happen when a person’s immune system overreacts to a normally harmless substance that the person has breathed in, touched, or eaten. Allergens— the antigens that bring on an allergic reaction—may be foods, medications, plants or animals, chemicals, dust, or molds. Some common allergic reactions are hay fever, allergic conjunctivitis (an eye reaction); asthma, pet-dander allergies, and skin reactions, such as hives.

A common cause for allergies are dust mites, a large part of household dust. If they are breathed in by an allergic person, the body parts of the dead mites can trigger asthma, a lung condition that causes a person to have difficulty breathing. Cat and dog dander, or skin flakes, can cause an allergic reaction, such as sneezing, wheezing, and running eyes and nose. Common food allergy triggers are the proteins in cow’s milk, eggs, peanuts, wheat, soy, fish, shellfish, and tree nuts.

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