What’s a charley horse?

A charley horse a muscle cramp, or sudden, uncontrolled contraction of a muscle. This type of pain is generally felt in the legs, sometimes after heavy exercise, and usually lasts just a few minutes.

The expression probably came from the word “charley,” which is used to describe a horse that is lame.

Will a wart go away if I wrap it in duct tape?

Maybe. Warts are skin infections caused by a common virus called HPV (human papillomavirus). They are perfectly “normal,” in that health researchers estimate that three out of four people will develop a wart some time in their lives, usually on their hands or feet. It can take months or years for a wart to disappear on its own. To speed up the process, some skin doctors recommend wrapping the wart in duct tape until it disappears.

The duct tape removes dead skin from the wart, thereby gradually killing off the wart virus that lives in the skin. It may also trigger the body’s immune system to attack the wart virus. Otherwise the wart can be removed by a doctor with a laser or liquid nitrogen, a substance that freezes the skin, killing the cells.

Does the red color in fruit juice really come from a beetle?

Yes. The red coloring that makes many juices and jams red is from a natural dye called carmine. Carmine is derived from conchineal, or conchineal extract, Which comes from the bodies of a female beetle (Dactylopius coccus) that lives on the Opuntia cactus. The insect is boiled and the scales of the insect are crushed into a red powder.

It takes about 70,000 insects to make one pound of cochineal. The ancient Aztecs used cochineal as a dye for cloth and other items, and today it is widely used as a coloring agent for food, beverages, and cosmetics.

Where did croissants, or crescent rolls, originate?

In 1683, during a time when all the nations of Europe were at war with each other, the Turkish army laid siege to the city of Vienna. The following year Poland joined Vienna against the Turks, who were ultimately forced to lift the siege in 1689.

As a celebration of victory, a Viennese baker introduced crescent-shaped rolls, or “croissants,” copying the shape of the crescent Islamic symbol on the Turkish flag.

How can I stay safe when I am walking?

Walking is a great way to exercise. Walking burns calories, strengthens back muscles, strengthens bones, reduces stress, helps improve your mood, helps you sleep better, and requires no equipment. Best of all, it is free and can be done almost anywhere! Walking also helps build community. A simple wave as you walk by your neighbors’ yard helps strengthen community connections. Walking, instead of driving, also reduces traffic congestion and pollution. It is important to be careful when you walk. During the day, wear bright, light clothing; at dusk, dawn, or nighttime, wear reflective clothing, with strips of material or tape attached that bounce back light. Be careful.

Always look both ways before crossing the street, obey traffic signals, and use the crosswalk. Be aware of all traffic, and make sure that drivers see you by making eye contact with them before you cross the street. Walk against the direction of traffic whenever possible. And remember, too, that walking with a friend is always safer than walking on your own. Encourage a friend or family member to join you! Be thoroughly familiar with your route. Know the location of phones, police or fire stations, and businesses, and always bring along some form of identification, like a school ID card.

Why do we say when someone has a raspy voice that he has a “frog in his throat”?

The expression “frog in your throat” doesn’t come from sounding like a frog because you have a cold or sore throat. It originates from an actual Middle Ages medical treatment for a throat infection.

Doctors believed that if a live frog was placed head-first into a patient’s mouth the animal would inhale the cause of the hoarseness into its own body. Thankfully, the practice is long gone, but the expression “frog in your throat” lives on.

What are allergies?

An allergic reaction is a reaction to a substance that is normally harmless to most other people. Allergies happen when a person’s immune system overreacts to a normally harmless substance that the person has breathed in, touched, or eaten. Allergens— the antigens that bring on an allergic reaction—may be foods, medications, plants or animals, chemicals, dust, or molds. Some common allergic reactions are hay fever, allergic conjunctivitis (an eye reaction); asthma, pet-dander allergies, and skin reactions, such as hives.

A common cause for allergies are dust mites, a large part of household dust. If they are breathed in by an allergic person, the body parts of the dead mites can trigger asthma, a lung condition that causes a person to have difficulty breathing. Cat and dog dander, or skin flakes, can cause an allergic reaction, such as sneezing, wheezing, and running eyes and nose. Common food allergy triggers are the proteins in cow’s milk, eggs, peanuts, wheat, soy, fish, shellfish, and tree nuts.

Posted on Categories Health

Why do my clothes need to be washed?

If you want to look clean and smell nice, your clothes need to be washed frequently. Most clothing is made of tiny threads that are woven together. As you go about your day, dirt and odors get trapped in the weave of your clothes and can only be removed by washing.

Clothes must be jiggled and swished around quite a bit in water—as is done in a washing machine—to best remove dirt and odors. Detergent is added to the water to help the process: it can break up oily particles into smaller pieces that can be whisked away, and it can surround other dirt particles and pull them away from fabric.

Interesting facts about Hair

1.    On average, a man spends about five months of his life shaving.
2.    On average, a hair strand’s life span is five and a half years.
3.    On average redheads have 90,000 hairs. People with black hair have about 110,000 hairs.
4.    Next to bone marrow, hair is the fastest growing tissue in the human body.
5.    In a lifetime, an average man will shave 20,000 times.
6.    Humans have about the same number of hair follicles as a chimpanzee has.
7.    Hair will fall out faster on a person that is on a crash diet.
8.    The longest human beard on record is 17.5 feet, held by Hans N. Langseth who was born in Norway in 1846.
9.    The average human head weighs about eight pounds.
10.    The reason why some people get a cowlick is because the growth of their hair is in a spiral pattern, which causes the hair to either stand straight up, or goes to a certain angle.
11.    The reason why hair turns gray as we age is because the pigment cells in the hair follicle start to die, which is responsible for producing “melanin” which gives the hair colour.
12.    The fastest growing tissue in the human body is hair.

13.    A lifespan of an eyelash is approximately 150 days.
14.    A survey done by Clairol 10 years ago came up with 46% of men stating that it was okay to color their hair. Now 66% of men admit to coloring their hair.
15.    The big toe is the foot reflexology pressure point for the head.
16.    The average human scalp has 100,000 hairs.
17.    The first hair dryer was a vacuum cleaner that was used for drying hair.
18.    Ancient Egyptians used to think having facial hair was an indication of personal neglect.
19.    The loss of eyelashes is referred to as madarosis.
20.    Hair and fingernails are made from the same substance, keratin.
21.    Eyebrow hair lasts between 3-5 months before it sheds.
22.    A Russian man who wore a beard during the time of Peter the Great had to pay a special tax.
23.    Everyday approximately 35 meters of hair fiber is produced on the scalp of an adult.
24.    Hair is made from the same substance as fingernails.
25.    Brylcreem, which was created in 1929, was the first man’s hair product.

Why are hot summer days called “the dog days”?

Sirius, the “dog star,” is within the constellation Canis Major and is the brightest in the heavens. The ancient Egyptians noted that the dog star’s arrival in July coincided with the annual flooding of the Nile, which was important for a good harvest.

The Romans believed that, because of its brightness, the dog star Sirius added to the heat of the summer sun, and so they called July and August “the dog days.”