Why do we say a corrupt person has “gone to the Devil”?

In Victorian times, to “go to The Devil” was to visit a bar on Flat Street near the London Civil Courts. The Devil was a favourite pub for lawyers, who seemed to spend more time in that bar than in their offices. If a client thought his money had “gone to The Devil” to pay for his lawyer’s drinks, he might visit the legal offices to ask for an explanation, where he would be told that the absent lawyer had indeed “gone to The Devil.”

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What will be the color of green in blue light?

Grass will appear dark in color because it absorbs all other colors of the light except its own green color. The blue light falling on grass will be absorbed by it, and hence, it will appear dark in color.

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What is the difference between a planet and a star?

A star is a huge ball of hot glowing gas, like the Sun, and a planet is a world, like Earth. Stars produce their own light; they undergo nuclear reactions that burn hydrogen in their cores. But planets are lit by light from the Sun. When you look up into the night sky, it is hard to tell planets and stars apart. However, early astronomers were able to tell the difference because planets in our solar system appear to move in complicated paths across the sky, but stars don’t. There are also other observational differences: planets almost never twinkle, but stars do.

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Which mammal is the smelliest?

If you have ever been to the zoo, you might think that some of the large animals, like the elephant, are the smelliest. But this title goes to one of the smaller mammals, the striped skunk. This black and white-striped creature sprays a foulsmelling, musky fluid as a defense against predators. Most wild skunks spray only when injured or attacked, as a defense mechanism. Their scent is composed of a chemical composition that can be released from one or both of their anal glands, located on both sides of their rectum. They can aim their glands at a target up to 15 feet (4.5 meters) away with great accuracy, but fortunately they tend to give a little bit of advanced warning: to signal being angry or scared, they often stamp their front feet, knead the ground like a cat, and hold their tail erect.

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My older sister says it’s a bad idea to stick jellybeans up my nose. Why?

The nasal cavity is made up of two narrow passages that lead from the nostrils to the nasopharynx. In the nasal cavity, air is prepared for its journey into the lower airways and lungs. It is a sensitive space. Jellybeans (as well as other candies, nuts, and peas) are about the size of a child’s nostril, and when lodged inside might get stuck there, or travel too far backward to manually remove. It may take a special trip to a doctor to get any foreign objects removed. Your older sister (or brother) is right: don’t stick anything up your nose, ever.

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Why is the word late used to describe the recently deceased?

To prefix a person’s name with “the late” certainly signifies that he or she is dead, although you would be correct in using it only with the name of someone who had died within the past twenty years. Its use began with medieval rulers, whose first name often had been passed down through generations of males. To avoid confusion with the living monarch, i.e., James II, his deceased father would be referred to as “the late King James.”

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Why, if someone isn’t up to the job, do we say he isn’t “worth his salt”?

Thousands of years ago, before money was introduced, workers and soldiers were often paid with a negotiated quantity of salt. More than as a seasoning, salt’s value was in its use as a preservative or cure for meat, as well as a medicine. The early Romans called this payment a “salarium,” which gave us the word salary. If a man wasn’t worth his salt, he wasn’t worth his salary.

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How do volcanoes erupt?

A volcano is a natural opening in Earth’s crust through which lava (hot molten, or melted, rock), gases, steam, and ash escape, often in a big, noisy eruption or explosion. These eruptions are thought to act like safety valves, relieving the enormous heat and pressure that exist deep in Earth’s interior. A volcano is usually a coneshaped mountain (its sides built up from solidified lava and ash) that has a hole or crater in its center through which it vents. There are several different kinds or stages of eruptions, many causing no damage to the places or people located near the volcano. But a few eruptions are huge and destructive. During these, lava can pour out and run down the volcano into surrounding areas, and enormous suffocating clouds of steam, ash, hot gases, and shooting rock can travel downhill at great speeds, covering many miles.

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Why is noisy chaos referred to as “bedlam”?

The word bedlam is a medieval slang pronunciation of “Bethlehem,” and its use to describe a mad uproar dates back to a London hospital for the insane. St. Mary in Bethlehem was incorporated in 1547 as the Royal Foundation for Lunatics. Because people could hear but only imagine the chaos inside, they began referring to any noisy, out-of-control situation as like that in “Bedlam” — Bethlehem hospital.

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